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As New York City’s public housing crumbles, pre-K centers go without crucial repairs

Mar 15, 2019 |

PHOTO: Christina Veiga/Chalkbeat

Yvette Ho, right, taps out a request to NYCHA to fix a leaky roof at CPC Jacob Riis Child Care Center. Meanwhile, a student shows her art project to Mary Cheng, who oversees early childhood programs for the Chinese-American Planning Council, a nonprofit that runs the daycare.

The tables where children would normally play had been dragged to create a makeshift barrier, blocking the 3- and 4-year olds from their favorite centers and from a growing puddle on the floor.

The ceiling at CPC Jacob Riis Child Care Center in the East Village was leaking again.

Center director Yvette Ho rushed to the classroom to survey the damage. On her phone, she tapped out a repair request to the landlord — NYCHA, New York City's public housing authority.

"This is the perennial leak," she said. "Just when you think it's fixed, it comes back again."

Decades of divestment, neglect, and mismanagement have left NYCHA buildings crumbling, forcing the city to give up some of its control of the housing authority to a federal overseer in an agreement struck last month. The plight of residents has been well documented in media reports and a scathing investigation by the U.S. Attorney's office in Manhattan, which uncovered out-of-service elevators, faulty heaters, and health hazards like rodent infestations, mold, and lead paint.

But few realize that nestled within those buildings are about 100 child care centers that serve infants and toddlers even while critically needed repairs stack up. Mostly run by nonprofits that rent space from NYCHA, those programs offer a lifeline for families, often earning high marks from the city's reviewers while also providing subsidized or free care for almost 5,000 children.

The programs face citations for facilities issues more often than programs in buildings leased from private landlords, a survey by the Day Care Council of New York found recently. Though it's not always clear who is responsible for making repairs, operators can face burdensome fines.

Providers "have to dig into their own pockets," said Mai Miksic, a research analyst for the Day Care Council. "They're paying fines for problems that aren't theirs."

Groups representing nonprofit providers operating out of NYCHA community centers have begun to join together to advocate for changes, and they say officials have shown interest in taking action. They also say they know that their needs represent only a sliver of the pressing facilities problems facing the country's largest public housing agency and its residents. Remediation of lead paint in agency apartments where children live is behind schedule, and the city estimates that NYCHA needs a total of more than $30 billion in repairs and upgrades.

Daycare centers alone require $130 million in fixes, according to NYCHA. That figure likely does not include problems that affect the entire buildings where the centers are located, such as boilers that need replacing.

The Jacob Riis houses, which were hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, needs almost $94 million in renovations over the next five years, including heating upgrades and drainage work, according to city figures.

The Chinese-American Planning Council, a 54-year-old social services organization that runs daycares and community programs in Lower Manhattan and Queens, has cared for small children in the complex for decades. It currently uses three classrooms in the basement of one of the towers, including one — the one with the persistent leak — that is part of Mayor Bill de Blasio's heralded Pre-K for All program.

Staff and children at the center have a front-row seat to the building's problems. A steam pipe in the main hallway frequently bursts. With every explosion, waterlogged ceiling tiles come crashing down and the center's only bathroom for children becomes off-limits due to dripping, scalding-hot water. NYCHA has encased the temperamental pipe in a makeshift closet.

At times, the facility's troubles have seemed too disruptive for the Chinese-American Planning Council to justify keeping its center in the building. All the garbage for the tower piles into a compactor room in the middle of the center. The only way to empty it, twice a day, is to haul the trash past classrooms and out an open door.

But Mary Cheng, the director of childhood services for the planning council, said they've resolved to stay because closing isn't a good option, either — not for kids of such a young age, who thrive on stability, and not for parents who rely on the center's longer hours so they can work to support their families.

"We had to think: Are we being a service to the community or a disservice?" Cheng asked. "You're faced with the issue of constant facility issues."

Operators say they stay because NYCHA centers are usually where their services can have the most impact and because the more affordable rent allows them to stretch their dollars even further.

"These buildings were built with community spaces for a reason. Neighborhoods need places for people to gather," said Melissa Aase, the executive director of University Settlement, a nonprofit that runs programs for seniors and after-school care in NYCHA buildings. "If we're crumbling, it sends a really powerful message to the residents about their worth."

NYCHA says it takes just over 10 days for the authority to respond to repair requests in community centers — a much shorter turnaround of more than a month across the system. Still, it's a long window that advocates say has sometimes forced programs to shut their doors or even have their licenses yanked.

The nonprofit Union Settlement runs five early childhood centers in NYCHA buildings across East Harlem. Sometimes, they've had to turn parents away who come to drop off their children in the morning because the classrooms are unbearably cold in the winter. The group is usually able to make space at another facility when an emergency forces one to close, but the sudden change can pose a "huge hardship" for families who need to get to work on time, said David Nocenti, the executive director.

"The same problems that the residents have, the nonprofits have as we're trying to serve those residents," Nocenti said. "Just like boilers go out in residential buildings and there's no heat, the same boiler generally affects the community centers as well."

Facilities breakdowns can leave operators vulnerable to fines from the city health department, which can reach thousands of dollars. Most programs operating in NYCHA centers are subsidized by the city, state, and federal funds, but typically public money can't be used to cover the citations. At Jacob Riis, the staff has resorted to "simple fundraisers" like bake sales to pay the fines, Cheng said. 

Centers take more than just a budgetary hit, as resolving the citations usually requires managers or other high-ranking officials spending hours at a city hearing.

"It's also a loss of the staff and a loss of the expertise at that time as well," Nocenti said. "If the department of health comes and you have no heat, you get fined for no heat, even though we don't control the boiler and can't make repairs to the boiler."

Aase said her organization has sometimes dug into its own budget to make repairs to keep its after-school and senior programs open. One University Settlement center has paid deep cleanings after 17 sewage floods in the course 12 months, she said, while another center with a rodent infestation has closed 10 times over the span of a year and required spending on extermination services.

A record of citations could pose problems for operators vying for city contracts, so it's better to pay for fixes than risk your reputation, Aase said. 

"When you have violations, it shows up as you're being vetted," she said. "We spend our own money because we know either that NYCHA doesn't have the funds or doesn't have the personnel to address the issue quickly enough, and community members want to come back."

Calling themselves the NYCHA Community Space Coalition, service providers that run more than 200 programs within public housing facilities have drawn up an action plan for addressing what they say is an emergency situation. They are calling for state money to help pay for repairs and reimbursement from the city when operators tap their own budgets for fixes. They are also asking for agreements that plainly spell out NYCHA's responsibilities and a clear delineation of who is responsible for which fines.

There have been encouraging signs, said J.T. Falcone, a policy analyst with United Neighborhood Houses, one of the organizations behind the coalition. NYCHA is meeting weekly with other city agencies to help speed up repairs, and Falcone said the authority has designated specific people to oversee work on pressing issues.

Locally, there have been small changes that can make a notable difference in the day-to-day operation of a center. At Jacob Riis, the trash is now taken out once before students arrive in the morning, and a lock has been placed on the door to the compactor room which had previously been left open and posed a potential risk to children.

While providers have found willing partners, a NYCHA official suggested there's only so much that can be done when faced with such deep needs across the housing authority.

"These centers are valuable assets to our communities that deserve to be preserved. But given NYCHA's dire financial position and more than $30 billion in capital needs, it is difficult to accommodate both the repairs needed to secure our residents' homes as well as the fixes for our centers," a NYCHA spokesman wrote in an email. "We continue to work with our partners to clearly lay out roles and responsibilities for each party to determine the best strategy for financing existing repair needs within the context of NYCHA's larger capital needs."

These thorny problems will soon fall also to the city's education department to help resolve.

Currently, contracts for publicly subsidized child-care centers are overseen by the Administration for Children's Services. But that oversight is set to shift to the education department beginning this summer, part of a high-stakes effort to streamline services for the city's children from birth through high school. Already, the education department has joined NYCHA's regular meetings with other city agencies.

"We'll continue to work closely with our providers in NYCHA facilities and support them through this transition," education department spokeswoman Isabelle Boundy wrote in an email.

For now, parents are left to keep their fingers crossed as they make use of programs that the mayor says could transform their children's lives — and the city's future.

Dexter Fauntleroy drops off his son at Jacob Riis most mornings. Three-year-old Kenai has gone to daycare there for most of his short life. Fauntleroy and his wife have kept their youngest son enrolled at the center, just down the street from their apartment in the Lillian Wald houses, because they're impressed with how much Kenai has learned and the dedication they see from the staff.

Of course, Fauntleroy has noticed persistent leaks and patch-job repairs. The thought that the roof could come crashing down on students someday has crossed his mind.

"Does that have to happen before it's taken seriously?" he asked. "There has to be some accountability."

Read the full article here

By Christina Veiga

 

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